Miso Chicken

Overhead shot of three chicken breasts glazed with miso in grey pan served over pea pods.

Miso Chicken is roasted in a rich, buttery miso glaze and served with a mixture of sugar snap peas, snow peas and shiitake mushrooms.

I’ve had a tub of white miso paste in my fridge for a couple of months now… With the hot weather, I haven’t been craving my usual steaming cups of miso soup. So, I created this recipe for Miso Chicken.

White miso is buttery, mildly salty and sweet – umami at its finest. It’s also packed with protein and other good-for-you nutrients. In this recipe, I’m combining it with garlic and ginger, and then slathering chicken breasts in this yummy sauce. The miso thickens and intensifies as it bakes, coating the chicken in a lovely, rich glaze, with flavors that make will make you swoon.  To finish it off, I topped it with a handful of chopped cashews for extra crunch. Perfection. 

Side view of miso glazed chicken on serving platter.

How Long Does Miso Last? 

  • Miso paste should be stored in a tightly sealed container in the refrigerator. Lighter varieties will keep for about 9 months and darker ones up to a year.

What to Serve with Miso Chicken

  • To go with this Miso Chicken, I made a quick saute of  shiitake mushrooms, watercress, snow peas, and sugar snap peas. The flavors of the bright peas are a great, fresh compliment to the tangy miso glaze, and the buttery shiitakes just help to round out the flavors in this dish even more. I also made a quick pot of rice.

But let’s not forget the wine.

Overhead shot of three chicken breasts glazed with miso in grey pan served over pea pods.

Wine Pairings for Miso Chicken: 

  • This dish calls for a white wine that can reflect the buttery miso glaze. Chardonnay makes a perfect match.
  • Pinot Noir is another great companion. The wine’s earthy elegance plays off the shiitake mushrooms, while its crisp acidity highlights the zesty garlic and the saltiness of the miso glaze.

I chose a Pinot Noir and Chardonnay from Clos du Val to pair with this Miso Chicken.

Clos Du Val Carneros Estate Pinot Noir

  • With a bright acidity, but a soft finish, this Pinot Noir was just the right wine to pair with this dish. The acidity balances out the rich miso glaze, and its earthy notes are perfect with this umami-filled dish and the blend of mushrooms and green vegetables that I served on the side.

Bottle of wine next to two poured glasses.

Clos Du Val Carneros Estate Chardonnay

  • This Chardonnay echoes the flavors of the buttery, miso glaze. But, with a clean finish, and a hint of minerality, it won’t overpower this dish.

Which wine would you choose to pair with this dish? I’d love to hear in the comments below.

I want to eat this dish again, and again, and aaahhh-gin. My miso soup may be left in the past… I’m going to be using it ALL to make this roasted chicken on a weekly basis.

If you loved this Miso Chicken recipe I would appreciate it so much if you would give it a star review! Also, be sure to snap a picture of your finished dish and share it with me on Instagram using the hashtag #platingsandpairings and tagging me @platingsandpairings.

For more great Platings & Pairings recipes, be sure to follow me on Pinterest, Facebook, YouTube and Twitter.

Miso chicken breast, sliced, served on grey dish with rice and green vegetables.

Chicken Recipes:

How to Make Miso Chicken:

Overhead shot of three chicken breasts glazed with miso in grey pan served over pea pods.

Miso Chicken

Course: Main Dish
Cuisine: Asian
Keyword: miso chicken, miso chicken breasts, miso roasted chicken
Prep Time: 10 minutes
Cook Time: 20 minutes
Total Time: 30 minutes
Servings: 4 servings
Calories: 665 kcal

Miso Chicken is roasted in a rich, buttery miso glaze and served with a mixture of sugar snap peas, snow peas and shiitake mushrooms.

Print

Ingredients

  • 4 chicken breasts boneless, skinless
  • 1 cup jasmine rice
  • 6 ounces watercress
  • 4 ounces snow peas
  • 6 ounces sugar snap peas
  • 4 cloves garlic minced
  • 4 ounces shiitake mushrooms caps thinly sliced and stems removed
  • 4 Tablespoons cashews chopped
  • 1 2-inch piece ginger peeled and minced
  • 1/2 cup white miso paste

Instructions

  1. Preheat oven to 475-degrees.

  2. In a small bowl, combine miso paste, ⅓ of the garlic, ⅓ of the ginger and 2 Tablespoons water; stir to thoroughly combine. Line a sheet pan with foil or parchment paper. Pat chicken breasts dry with paper towels; season with salt and pepper. Place on sheet pan and spread miso mixture on the top. Cook 20-22 minutes, or until browned and cooked through to an internal temperature of 165-degrees.

  3. While chicken roasts, in a small pot, bring rice, a big pinch of salt and 1 1/4 cups water to a boil. Once boiling, cover and reduce heat to low. Simmer 15 minutes, or until the water has been absorbed and the rice is tender. Remove from heat and fluff with a fork.

  4. Once chicken has roasted for 10 minutes, in a large pan, heat 2 teaspoons oil over medium-high heat. Add mushrooms and cook, stirring occasionally, 3-5 minutes, or until the mushrooms are lightly browned. Add the remaining garlic and ginger and cook, stirring occasionally, about 1 minute, or until softened and fragrant.

  5. Add watercress, snow peas and sugar snap peas to mushrooms; season with salt and pepper. Cook, stirring frequently, 2-3 minutes, or until bright green.

  6. Divide cooked rice and finished vegetables between four plates. Top with a chicken breast. Garnish with cashews. Enjoy!

Nutrition Facts
Miso Chicken
Amount Per Serving
Calories 665 Calories from Fat 204
% Daily Value*
Fat 22.7g35%
Saturated Fat 5.8g36%
Cholesterol 111.4mg37%
Sodium 1403mg61%
Carbohydrates 63.8g21%
Fiber 7.6g32%
Sugar 8.7g10%
Protein 50.3g101%
* Percent Daily Values are based on a 2000 calorie diet.

I teamed up with Clos du Val to bring you this post. As always, all opinions are my own. 

Miso Roasted Chicken - A Quick + Delicious 30 Minute Dinner platingsandpairings.com

20 comments

  1. Jenni

    Lovely! I just threw out our miso paste as we had still not used them all up much past their year shelf life. We love having it in the fridge for the random cup of soup… but, now I have a reason to go pick some more up before the weather cools down.

    Reply

    1. Erin

      Totally agree Jenni – It’s fun finding new uses for everyday items!

      Reply

  2. Jenni K

    I will totally make this. Yum. Nice photos too.

    Reply

    1. Erin

      Thanks Jenni – Let me know how you like it!!! I love to hear back!

      Reply

  3. Pech

    This looks amazing, I too have had a lonely neglected jar of Miso waiting for me, thanks for sharing!

    Reply

    1. Erin

      You are SO welcome Pech – Enjoy!

      Reply

  4. Jen

    Wow – so easy! We don’t do much chicken but I’m going to try this with tofu… Those pictures are definitely an inspiration. Thanks!

    Reply

    1. Erin

      Jen – It is definitely an impressive looking dish that doesn’t take too much time, or too many obscure ingredients. Perfect for a great weeknight dinner!

      Reply

  5. Melinda

    What a lovely dish! It is almost too pretty to eat!

    Reply

    1. Erin

      Thanks Melinda – Almost too pretty… But too yummy not to!

      Reply

  6. Catherine

    Mm, I love the flavor of miso! It’s one of my favorite things to get at Japanese restaurants.

    Reply

    1. Erin

      I totally agree Catherine! Buttery and salty, and a little sweet – Yum!

      Reply

  7. Stacee T.

    Oh my goodness, that looks delicious!!!!

    Reply

    1. Erin

      Thanks Stacee! I have never had miso in this fashion before, but now I can’t wait to put in on SO many more things!!!

      Reply

  8. Marissa @ OMG FOOD

    Wow, this looks incredible. Gorgeous photos!

    Reply

  9. Helen

    This looks delicious-will try to cook.

    Reply

    1. Erin

      Thanks Helen – I’d love to hear back on how you like it!

      Reply

  10. Rachel

    3 stars
    I have mixed feelings about this dish. I liked the umami element-but man was it super salty! I would definitely cut back on the amount of miso paste, by half or more.

    Reply

    1. Erin

      Thanks for the feedback Rachel – I think that different varieties of miso paste can vary in saltiness. Also, the miso can become more concentrated if it has been around for a while. Definitely good advice to take into account.

      Reply

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