How to Cook Perfect Rice in the Instant Pot + VIDEO

With these easy tips, you’ll see it’s simple to learn how to cook perfect rice in the Instant Pot with minimal measuring. The result is fluffy and flavorful rice that’s easy to prepare.

With these easy tips, you’ll see it's simple to learn how to cook perfect rice in the Instant Pot with minimal measuring. The result is fluffy and flavorful rice that’s easy to prepare. | platingsandpairings.com

It took a while for me to finally bite the bullet and invest in an Instant Pot, but I talked in this post about how my obsession quickly began with this amazing appliance. I can honestly say that it’s the most used appliance in my house – I use it almost every day!

If you haven’t yet heard of the Instant Pot, let me introduce you: It’s an electric pressure cooker that has all these handy little buttons on it for cooking different things:

  • Hardboiled Eggs: Just add a little water to the pot, place your eggs on the cooking rack (as many as you’d like), and press the “EGG” button – Perfect hardboiled eggs in just about 10 minutes.
  • Meat: You can cook meat and poultry from frozen or fresh and it always comes out tender and moist – Love!
  • Slow Cooker: Use the Instant Pot just like you would use your crockpot – Set it to cook on low for any amount of time that you’d like, it will automatically turn to “WARM” when the time is up.
  • Dried Beans: Cook them in under 30-minutes with no pre-soaking.

Today I thought I’d share with you my “method” for how to cook perfect rice in the Instant Pot.

How Do you Make Rice in the Instant Pot?

It’s very simple, but there are a couple changes that I make from my traditional recipe for perfect rice on the stovetop. First is the water ratio – While I generally use 1 cup rice to 1 ¼ cups water for my stovetop rice, in the Instant Pot, that ratio drops down to 1-to-1. 1 cup of water for every one cup of rice – You can make as little or as much Instant Pot rice as you’d like.

The reason for the reduced water is that the Instant Pot is more “sealed” than a traditional cooking pot, meaning less evaporation of water during the cooking process. Be sure to rinse that rice before adding it to the Instant Pot, to get rid of any additional starches – Just run it under water until the water is clear. The result is perfect Instant Pot rice that’s light and fluffy.

I also like to add in 1 teaspoon of oil for each cup of rice that I’m making – This not only prevents the rice from sticking to the pot, but it also cuts down on the foaming a bit so that your Instant Pot doesn’t sputter and spit. Plus, for perfect Instant Pot rice, I always add a pinch of salt for each cup of rice that I’m cooking, to flavor the rice right from the get-go.

Steps for Making Instant Pot Rice

  • Rinse rice under cold running water until water runs clear.
  • Add oil to Instant Pot along with the rinsed rice, water and salt.
  • Lock the lid and set the steam valve to seal.
  • Cook white rice for 4-8 minutes or r follow the cooking chart below.
  • Allow the pressure to release naturally for 10 minutes and then release any remaining pressure.
  • Fluff rice with a fork and serve.

If you’d like to add even more flavor and nutrition to your Instant Pot Rice, you could cook it in bone broth instead of water. I love to make bone broth in either my slow cooker or instant pot. All you need is some leftover meat bones and veggie scraps. 

With these easy tips, you’ll see it's simple to learn how to cook perfect rice in the Instant Pot with minimal measuring. The result is fluffy and flavorful rice that’s easy to prepare. | platingsandpairings.com

Most Instant Pot models will have a “RICE” button – This is the perfect button to use if you’re cooking white rice. If you’re cooking any other type of rice, be sure to follow the timing chart below – The water to rice ratio will remain the same.

Note that you still need to account for the time it takes for the Instant Pot to come to pressure, and then for the natural pressure release. It will take about 10 minutes for the pressure to build, and then we will let the pressure release naturally for 10 minutes too. So, in reality, you should add 20 minutes to the cooking time below. Hopefully that will be helpful with your dinner planning.

With these easy tips, you’ll see how simple it is to cook perfect rice in the Instant Pot. Have you jumped on the Instant Pot bandwagon yet?

Be sure to check out my recipe for making perfect quinoa in the Instant Pot too!

Instant Pot Rice Recipe

With these easy tips, you’ll see it's simple to learn how to cook perfect rice in the Instant Pot with minimal measuring. The result is fluffy and flavorful rice that’s easy to prepare. | platingsandpairings.com

How to Cook Perfect Rice in the Instant Pot

With these tips you’ll see it's simple to learn how to cook perfect rice in the Instant Pot . The result is fluffy & flavorful rice that’s easy to prepare with minimal measuring.
3.85 from 506 votes
Print Pin
Prep Time: 1 minute
Cook Time: 8 minutes
Time for pressure to build and release: 20 minutes
Total Time: 28 minutes
Servings: 4 people

Ingredients

  • 1 cup rice
  • 1 cup water
  • 1 tsp . cooking oil
  • 1 pinch salt

Instructions

  • Rinse rice under cold running water until the water runs clear.
  • Add oil to the Instant Pot along with the rinsed rice (still damp), water and salt.
  • Lock the lid and set the steam valve to its “sealing” position. Select the “RICE” button or follow the cooking chart below. Allow the pressure to release naturally for 10 minutes and then release any remaining pressure. Fluff rice with a fork and serve.

Notes

  • White & Basmati Rice: 4-8 minutes
  • Brown Rice: 22-24 minutes
  • Wild Rice: 25-30 minutes
Did you make this recipe?Mention @platingsandpairings or tag #platingsandpairings!

Nutrition

Calories: 168kcal | Carbohydrates: 36g | Protein: 3g | Sodium: 5mg | Potassium: 53mg | Calcium: 13mg | Iron: 0.4mg

More Instant Pot recipes:

Instant Pot Butter Chicken

Instant Pot Butter Chicken in bowl served with lime wedges and naan.

The BEST Instant Pot Pork Carnitas

Four carnitas tacos arranged on marble surface with toppings.

Instant Pot Chicken Tortilla Soup

Side view of bowl of tortilla soup.

Instant Pot Weight Loss Soup 

Close up on bowl of Instant Pot Weight Loss Soup

Instant Pot Cabbage Roll Soup

Side view of bowl of cabbage roll soup.

Instant Pot Baked Potatoes (with Crispy Skins) 

Overhead close up of baked potatoes.

 

 

225 thoughts on “How to Cook Perfect Rice in the Instant Pot + VIDEO”

      • 5 stars
        New to IP and having fun with it! Was suggested to me, by a seasoned IP cook, to cut down on pressurizing time, use the saute button to ” preheat” your IP while getting ingredients ready, when hot, hit cancel, add rice & liquid, set on high pressure for required time. Rice came out perfect.

        Reply
        • Hi, I realize your original post was a few years ago but am just seeing this. If you turn on sauté to cut down on pressurizing time won’t that affect how the food is cooked since it is beginning to cook as it gets pressurized? Thanks! I’m kinda new to this also!

          Reply
      • Hi Erin, I just bought an IP. Haven’t been able to get the rice to water ratio correct. My dad likes the rice soft but not mushy. I’ve always used traditional rice cooker and a 1:1 ratio and never had problems until recently. My rice cooker is old and gave up. My question though is about time. My IP has a rice setting and it defaults to 20 minutes. In that setting it doesn’t let me increase or decrease the time. I would have to use either multigrain setting or pressure cooker setting. Based on your blog total time should be 28 minutes?

        Reply
        • Hi Barbara – I would use the MANUAL pressure cooker setting on your IP. For white rice, the cook time is 4-8 minutes. If your dad prefers soft but not mushy rice, I would try it for 6 minutes. See how that works!

          Reply
    • 4 stars
      Well… I love my instant pot, but you’re looking at about 2-5 minutes for it to come to pressure and with a 10 minute natural pressure release, your actually looking at about 20 mins altogether.

      Reply
        • Hands off and a reliably great sticky rice for whatever I’m making in my other instant pot insert like sesame chicken, beef & broccoli, etc.

          Reply
        • @ Al, my thoughts exactly! Not so instant after all — the ads conveniently don’t tell you about that pre- and post-cooking time overhead. I think IP is great for cooking meat, although since I cook for one, I am experimenting with cooking smaller quantities of 2 or 3 meats at the same time, so I don’t have to eat the same thing for a month (I live in a small apartment with a small size fridge freezer). If the Emeril Pressure Air Fryer unit came in a 3 quart, I would snap it up.

          Reply
      • Don’t know what you mean with this “10 minute natural pressure release” shizz, it takes like 2 minutes, 3 tops. Probably still quicker than doing instant rice

        Reply
    • One for one water to rice ratio is wrong. Rice came out hard. Whoever wrote this is an idiot. 1 cup rice to 1.5 for instant pot.

      Only reason I clicked on this article was to get that ratio. My own dumb luck it was a retard.

      Reply
        • 5 stars
          Erin, please disregard No’s posting. Your recipe is great! I have been cooking rice for years and have told everyone it is the best when made in IP. I came to the same conclusion on my own to have less water and coat the bottom of the pot with oil. I use about 1 tbs of coconut oil for 2 cups of rice and it gives a very pleasant fragrance to the rice and prevents it from sticking. And definite yes for the broth! I am planning to use your IP quinoa recipe!

          Reply
        • 4 stars
          I agree with No somewhat, I thought it needed more water. It wasn’t hard but a little dry. That being said, No, were you raised by wolves or just classless. A simple comment would have sufficed but “retard”, really. I bet your parents are proud.

          Reply
        • I have to agree with “no’s” comment. Not enough water, rice comes out hard regardless if it is white rice or brown. I have tried this with Botan Calrose, Indian Basmati, and shortgrain brown rice and it is clearly not enough water — hard and crunchy every time. A rice cooker is way more efficient and reliable, and if you have a good rice cooker (like a Tiger) with a “quick rice” setting, it will work just as fast.

          Reply
        • 5 stars
          Erin – if your recipe doesn’t come out the way you expect it to, just a simple comment such as ” the rice was not cooked enough for me. I think I’ll try a 1 – 1.5 ratio next time”. No need to call people names. Be kind!!

          Reply
          • 1 to 1 ratio was perfect for me as well. I don’t understand the “+” and”-“ buttons. My pressure shows high and normal but why would I change it?

        • Did you rinse the rice first? I wonder the residual water from rinse is the variable that is not explicitly stated. Not everyone rinses rice the same way and some leaves more water from the rinse than others.

          Reply
      • 4 stars
        I feed a big family so i did 2.5 cups of water, 2 cups of rinsed rice, 1/3 of turkey neck broth , soften butter && seasonings. My instant pot sets the rice selection to 10 mins, and my time doesnt count until the pressure builds.

        Reply
      • Wow someone needs to be a little nice. Calling people idiots and retards is so childish. I’m sure you can find a better way to post. if you don’t like it or it doesn’t work for you try another way. Have a blessed day “No”.

        Reply
      • 5 stars
        No need to use the r word or other names. If it didn’t turn out for you fine. Go find another recipe but it seems you already know the ratio.

        Reply
      • Dear NO-
        Using this kitchen tool can have a steep learning curve. I have to add time and liquid due to altitude, hardness of water, and freshness of product. The 1:11/2 rice to water ratio
        does not even work at sea level. This stuff is supposed to be fun. If you get crunchy rice add some liquid and more time. Try bringing something to the “table” (pun intended instead of hating on this author and her experience; for her this is the “perfect” rice.

        Reply
        • 5 stars
          Thank you all for addressing the rude and uncalled for comment!! I can’t believe people still talk that way what a shame.
          I followed the recipe ..I was a bit worried or nervous as I’m very new to IP cooking this was the second thing I made. It came out wonderful just right. I realize what some are saying as far as time.. but using the IP I don’t have to sit and wonder if my heat is too high too low if its sticking to the bottom.. don’t have to watch it . ..I’m free to do other things while the IP is doing its thing.. also I think that when you rinse the rice and the time that it has to sit in the steady pot while you let the pressure down naturally also allow for the continued cooking.. it’s like the finishing touch.. cant wait to try other rice recipes. Thank you for the recipe and tips. =)

          Reply
      • 5 stars
        Relax dude. That’s the ratio it suggests in the actual Instant Pot manual. Stop internet trolling and being a dick to people who are just trying to be helpful

        Reply
          • Perhaps factors like: 1) Was the rinsed rice drained or still wet could affect the results 2) Even white rice can vary in cooking times from Basmati, to Italian, parboiled, Thai fragrant etc. 3) Everyone’s preference for rice is different, some like it separated like Basmati some like it sticky like Sushi rice. Even in the same family, I remember there were differences. Adjust it to taste, cheers!

    • You should all try adding lemon to your rice – sometimes I add lemon juice and top up the amount of juice with water to the max amount of liquid you want. Or use lemon zest. Great with fish or chicken or whatever takes your fancy 😁 I also mostly use Thai sticky (Jasmine) rice. Everyone who tastes it loves it. Because I mostly cook for 1, I use about 1 or 1 and a half espresso cups raw rice. To this I add about half a cup of lemon juice and top up to make 1,5 cups liquid in total. Yum Yum 😁

      Reply
      • Love the idea of lemon juice and would never have thought of it. Thank you!
        This will be my first try using the pot and not an insert pot on manual pressure. Hoping this fixes it because the other comes out too gummy. And, it could be the type of rice.

        Reply
    • Thanks for the tips on cooking rice in an Instant Pot. Appreciated the water ratio hints and the timing for other rice. Nice to know that the IP is so versatile. Really like the fact that unlike other rice cookers you are not cooking in aluminum.

      Reply
    • I don’t have an egg button on mine. I’ve never been good at cooking rice and I had a girlfriend who intentionally would burn food so I would do most of the cooking. My friend Paul made her get a rice cooker when they became roommates because he told her that he wasn’t going to have her burning his pots and pans and he wasn’t going to cook for her. I got the instant pot Duo 7 in 1 multi-use pressure cooker. It is 6 quarts. I had originally tried to buy one off of Walmart and the one I got was $49 right after Thanksgiving and the one I had wanted was a 10 in 1 and it was only $10 but it looks like they had no intention of ever selling it at that price. The 10 in one obviously would be much better than the 7 in 1. Looking forward to finding recipes my rice cooker didn’t come with any utensils or recipes I guess you have to kind of go and look online to find them.

      Reply
  1. I have a rice cooker, and can’t imagine going back to making rice in a regular pot because it’s so nice to put the rice and water and just press a button and then focus on making the main components to go with the rice instead of thinking about the rice

    Reply
  2. I think I’m the last person on earth to jump on the Instant Pot bandwagon. I’m a low and slow gal through and through I guess. Though I am crazy curious about this whole world of cooking! I’ve been very very tempted to look into one after reading recipe after recipe from this miracle appliance!

    And ironically I was thinking to myself just last night as I made some fried rice for my kids that I can cook a mean meal, better than your average joe, but I simply cannot cook perfect rice. I either burn it or make it soggy. Seriously, every time! And no, I don’t own a rice cooker either.

    Reply
        • Hmmmm… I’m sorry that happened for you DC. One thing it could have been is that the Instant Pot was not sealed properly? Did the valve pop up during the cooking process?

          Reply
        • The recipe doesn’t call for enough water- it should be a 2:1 ratio of water to rice. I had the same problem the first time, doubled the water, and it came out great on the second.

          Reply
          • 3 stars
            Yes, what Ekho said about the ratio. The instructions on the bag of rice say 2:1 ratio, so I was really doubtful when I read the article saying 1:1 or 1:1.1. That’s instant rice territory, not regular cooked rice.

          • Actually, I mentioned this in the post. It is actually a 1:1 ratio in the Instant Pot because there is no evaporation in the Instant Pot like on the stove top. I’m curious Mark – Did you actually try the recipe? The 1:1 ratio works perfectly for me every time, so I would be interested to know if it’s actually not working for you…

          • My rice was also a little crunchy with the 1:1 ratio- but I didn’t pre-rinse the rice. I’m curious if this could be the problem people are running into.

    • 5 stars
      rice should be rinsed to remove the extra starch–water through the rice in a strainer until the water runs clear–the wet rice to the IP—the reputable cooking advisors have used about 1 to 1.25 ratio for awhile now–good luck

      Reply
  3. I have yet to jump on the Instapot train but it seems that everyone I know has one! I’m planning to share your recipe with those folks. And I’m making rice in my rice cooker tonight and will try a smudge of oil just to see if I can lessen the sputtering and spitting. Often times, I just put it in the sink to cook in order to reduce my post-rice cooker cleanup.

    Reply
  4. 4 stars
    I just tried this with a pearl rice, I set it for 6 min and it was a little over done, so will try 5 min next time. Out of curiosity, what kind of rice would you use with the rice setting, which is 12 minutes, and can’t be changed.

    Reply
  5. I am confused about the Pressure button. When I turn on my Pot the pressure is default to low. I have tried cooking my rice without changing it and the rice is watery. If I change it to High the then I get wonderful rice. I notice it is not mentioned in the recipes to change the pressure setting. Is my pot not set up right? I live about 6,000 ft. Is that the reason for the need for higher pressure. Any suggestions would be helpful.

    Reply
  6. Is there a trick to making rice and chicken strips at the same time?
    I love to cook my meals all together and at times I will use chicken broth instead of water to cook my rice in. Any tips??

    Reply
    • To be honest Dawn, I haven’t tried it… Are you wanting the chicken strips separate from the rice? I would maybe put the rice below and then insert that metal basket upside down so that the strips are lifted off of the rice. Like, place them on that metal sling…? I have a feeling the chicken may cook a lot faster than the rice though, but perhaps with the steam, it won’t dry out…? I think I need to put this to the test!

      Reply
    • You could saute the chicken first, i do it with onions and a little fajitis seasoning, i then just add my water and rice and put the cooker on rice and let the PO go.

      Reply
  7. Do you put it on manual to change it to 8 minutes for white rice? I put it on the rice but it automatically does 12 minutes not 8. Or there’s also the multigrain that does high pressure instead of low pressure and you can adjust the minutes. Is that the one you use?

    Reply
  8. Okay, so I am brand new to the Instant pot and I am wondering about the water/rice ratio. I always use brown rice but do 2 cups water for every cup rice. Is it really one/one? If so, why such a difference?

    Reply
  9. Hi
    Is it a straight normal cup measurement for water and rice or a normal cup for the water but a rice cup measure for the rice?
    Thanks:)

    Reply
  10. I am thinking of getting a 8 qt instant pot but when I cook rice I only need 2 cups usually. Would two cups of water be enought to start the pressurized process in the 8 qt pot? Or should I just get a 6 qt? (I really wanted the extra capacity for cooking larger portions although there is only 2 adults and 2 kids in the house).

    Reply
  11. I like adding minced garlic into my rice after it’s done cooking – but that’s with a regular rice cooker.
    Do you think adding minced garlic into the InstaPot, with the rice and water before cooking, will be okay?

    Reply
    • That sounds great Crystal – I think that should work… I’d love to hear back if you try it. Maybe you could try leaving the cloves whole? They may get softened and then you can mash them into the rice…?

      Reply
  12. Not sure what’s wrong but with rice + vegetables, with RICE button selected, cook time takes about 30-40 minutes and seem to defeat the “instant” part of this instant pot. Why’s that?

    Reply
    • Yeah, that’s the biggest secret with IP; everyone hypes up the quick “cooking time” but forgets the “total time” is way longer. This recipe took me 35 minutes: 15 minutes for IP to “warm up,” 10 to cook (used “Rice” button), then 10 to release pressure. Where’s the time savings over a normal rice cooker? Do you have to cook a huge amount? At a minimum, could you please revise your noted “total time” on this recipe to at least 30 minutes?

      Reply
  13. I”m confused about the directions “let the pressure…release naturally” . What does that mean? There are two places for the pressure thingy to be. Is it on the pressure side or the release side??

    Reply
  14. Almost every recipe I see for the Instant Pot ignores the wait time for the pressure to be released. WHY do people not add this to the complete time of the recipe???

    Reply
    • 5 stars
      Because the wait time varies greatly. If the ingredients are frozen, water is cold … it will take longer for the pot to come to pressure than when the ingredients and pot are hot. The time to pressurize also varies with the volume of ingredients in the pot.

      Reply
  15. 4 stars
    One way to avoid all the rinsing: sauté the rice in oil first. I set my instant pot to sauté and when it’s hot I add a couple tablespoons of coconut oil. Add the rice and sauté for a couple minutes stirring the rice. Add the water, close the IP and start the pressure cooking process. Not only does the rice come out perfect with separate grains, you convert a small amount of the starches that would have made it sticky into “resistant starch”. You can’t digest resistant starches so they don’t contribute calories to your diet, but more importantly the gut bacteria that keep your colon healthy and operating correctly need that resistant starch to survive. Feed your gut!

    Reply
  16. Why do so many recipes on the internet have to start out with a story or drawn-out explanation? I’m not interested in seeing all of the pictures or any backstory behind it. I just want the recipe and the instructions. Anything else is a waste of time.

    I’m not trying to be mean, it’s just way too often that this happens. I can’t be the only one who feels this way.

    Reply
      • First, thank you for the recipe. I’m waiting to receive my IP, so I’m gathering recipes while I wait! Second, thank you SO MUCH for the handy button tip! I’m not a foodie, so I’m not interested in pics. I would just scroll down until I could find the recipe. Never noticed the jump button. You have saved me much scrolling time! Thanks! I look forward to following your blog.

        Reply
  17. 5 stars
    I’ve mastered chili and pork carnitas, but needed to try rice and grains. Thanks for this! I followed exactly and the rice was perfection. I’ve never been able to get it to the right texture on the stove top and never bought a rice cooker. So this is great. If folks are wondering, I just used the Rice Button on my IP. When it was done, I set a timer for 10 mins and just took the lid off. Thanks again!

    Reply
    • Hi Jennifer – There is a timing chart right below the recipe. It’s not really a “chart” per se, I should probably change the wording.

      Reply
  18. 4 stars
    This is a solid recipe. No complaints on the quality.

    But I agree with a few other users. The cook time should say 8 minutes, but your Total Time should be realistic and not 8 minutes. It should be the pressure time, which could be another 10 minutes, then another 10 at the end for natural release. So why not say 25 or 30 minutes for Total Time.

    Its the same story with anything else you cook in the instant pot. You always need to build in an additional 10-20 minutes for the pressure to build.

    Reply
  19. I need advice….hosting dinner party for 10, I have a 6-qt. IP, how much rice should I make, and for how long in IP?? Thanks

    Reply
  20. 5 stars
    This recipe for Instant Pot rice came out perfectly for me! I’ve tried it with brown and white rice and they were both amazingly fluffy!

    Reply
  21. Hi! Do u adjust the water for brown rice? Typically in my rice cooker (which just broke so I’m gonna try the IP) I use more water for brown rice vs white rice. Thanks!

    Reply
  22. 5 stars
    Hi! I followed the directions exactly and it came out sticky rice(which is good to know for future recipes) I didn’t see that you had to put in manual mode lol. Thanks for sharing!

    Reply
  23. This just isn’t coming out quite right for me. I feel it needs a bit more water… or something. I’m use to making rice in a microwave steamer and it comes out great. This seems like the texture is a bit too hard and the rice seems very sticky. A weird combination. Maybe this is normal for pressure cooked rice? I’ve tried it twice and did it exactly as you instructed. I rinsed under water until it ran clear, dumped in my 2 cups of white rice and 2 cups of water with a bit of salt and oil, sealed it up and put it on High Pressure for 8 minutes. I let it naturally release for 10 minutes then opened up the vent to let the rest of the pressure out. Twice I had the same results which weren’t serveable in my opinion. Any suggestions on how to tweak this?

    Reply
  24. I’m even later to the IP game than you are, as I just bought mine a few weeks ago for 41% discount on Amazon Prime day. The least expensive it has ever been previously is 30% off. So I figured that I can’t lose. After using it the last few weeks, I have to say that I reverted back to my slow cooker. We eat only grass fed/pastured meats and the IP just doesn’t get the falling off the bone, fork tender like the slow cooker. However, what it does do very well is cook hard boiled eggs and rice. So if that is the primary use of the IP, and for what I paid, it wasn’t a bad price for a rice cooker/egg boiler. I bought an egg insert that lets me make 14 eggs at a time. I had recently seen another insert that can fit a few more eggs, although 14 is fine for our small family. All I could do on stove top was 6, and they were always very hit or miss as to whether they would be overcooked or if they were less cooked but I couldn’t get the peel off without losing half the white in the process. I’m still trying to tweak the cooking time with the IP to be more of a medium boiled egg. But even when the yolks have been too liquidy for me (but my husband will eat them), the eggs still peel well. So that is a win. I also used to stove top cook my rice and it would be ok, but more on the mushy side. When I cook rice in the slow cooker, it is cooked and fluffy, like restaurant rice. So for the price I got the IP for, if I just use it a few times a month for rice and eggs, that’s fine. It does seem to make a nice chicken broth as well, but the chicken itself comes off the bone better making it on the stove top. But I have had times this summer with camp schedules where I just don’t have hours to sit at home and babysit a pot of broth, and have resorted to the IP (but will go back to stove top once our school year schedule starts and I can plan a day at home each week to make broth). My IP model does NOT have an EGG button. So that’s interesting that you have a model that does have one.

    Reply
  25. I saw this comment earlier but it wasn’t replied to. You say to use the “rice” button for white rice, but that cooks on low pressure. For your cooking chart on manual, are you still using low pressure, or high pressure? The cooking manual doesn’t specify either.

    Reply
  26. I have a dumb question: After cooking the rice, and letting pressure release naturally for 10 minutes, do you turn off the warming feature? My instant pot stays on warming by default; does that matter for cooking rice? Many thanks!

    Reply
  27. 4 stars
    Hello Erin,
    I’d like to abandon my rice cooker and use the InstantPot for rice, but I have 2 questions. The rice I use is Brown Basmati Rice, should I consider that brown rice, and to for the 20+ minutes, or should I consider it basmati rice and cook for the lower time?
    The second is the water ratio, on the jar it says 1 cup of rice and 2 1/4 cups of water. Should I go with that, or should I use the 1 to 1 ratio because it’s in the Instant Pot?
    All clues to the clueless are greatly appreciated!
    Cheers, Ray

    Reply
      • In my 8 quart IP, a 1:1 rice to water ratio always comes out crunchy. I always use 1 1/4 cup water per 1 cup of rice and it comes out perfectly. I also never cook less than 2 cups of rice in my big IP or it doesn’t come out right. I was thinking with bigger pots it takes longer to pressurize which means more lost steam before it seals.

        Reply
  28. 5 stars
    I don’t usually leave comments on recipes, but I felt like this was a great chance to start. I made this recipe EXACTLY per the instructions and it came out absolutely perfect. I have struggled with making rice for my whole life and it was such a relief to open my instant pot and have perfectly cooked rice. The 1-1 ratio is exactly what is needed for instant pot rice. Great work with this recipe!

    Reply
  29. 5 stars
    I enjoy a good bowl of rice, but I can’t stand it when the rice is too dry or mushy. Rice is fantastic i it’s prepared right, but I’ve yet to master cooking a good bowl of rice on a regular basis. I never thought of using an Instapot for rice, but it makes sense. Sometimes I throw in some chicken broth when I cook rice and I might try that.

    Reply
  30. Hey Erin, such an informative article you had shared.we all cook rice usually but didn’t know how to make that correctly. You described clearly about the process.thanks for sharing this tips.it will help us to cook rice perfectly. Keep posting like this.. 🙂

    Reply
  31. I’m going to try doing rice in my IP for the first time. As per the advice in comments, I’m going to use the manual setting for 8 minutes on high pressure. 1:1 rice and water ratio with a bit of olive oil. What I’m going to do differently is setting it on a two hour timer while we go to Christmas Eve worship. We hope to come back to rice in the IP and chicken in the Crock-Pot. A set and forget meal. I’ll let you know how it goes. The time to cook is no different than doing it on the stove. The IP advantage I’m looking for is that theoretically it will cook itself while I’m away.

    Reply
  32. I used 1:1 ratio, and set the Instant Pot for 1 minute (as per the “Perfect Jasmine Rice” recipe that came with my IP) and during the cooking process, my IP said “BURN” on it….so I stopped the process and, after cooling, opened it up to find that most of the rice was pretty close to cooked. Just slightly undercooked but that makes sense as I stopped the process. The rice on the bottom was burned onto the IP (basically like it happens with most regular rice cookers). Anyone else having “BURN” come up? Is the rice on the bottom always going to burn? Suggestions?

    Reply
  33. 4 stars
    The 1:1 ratio didn’t work for me either. I tried it twice before I decided I needed to increase the water to a 1.5 ratio.

    Reply
  34. 5 stars
    Hi Erin
    While I’m not a fan of sticky rice I love the idea of rinsing the rice as you do for Quinoa.. I have cooked both with your ratio of water and both have come out perrfectly and I coat my pot with 1 coconut cooking spray. Fantastic.

    Reply
  35. 5 stars
    So the 1:1 ratio can change based on elevation. The higher the elevation, the more water. This “no” commenter has a bug up their butt! Modify your recipe and if it doesn’t work, it’s not an absolute science!

    We used leftover broth from making carnitas a couple nights before and made Mexican rice. It was incredible!

    Reply
  36. 5 stars
    This is the first time my rice came out light and fluffy. I followed your recipe except I didn’t rinse my rice first (I actually forgot bc never do it), and I used coconut oil. I let it sit 10 min after it was finished then released any pressure left. This is my go to for rice now. Thank you.

    Reply
  37. 5 stars
    I added minced garlic, chopped cilantro, and butter instead of the vegatable oil.
    1 cup of rice to one 1/8 cup of water, and it was delicious!!! (The extra water was because I like my rice a little sticky) if not, just ommit the extra water. 1/1 rice/water ratio works fine, but you do have to rinse the rice first.

    Reply
  38. I haven’t had the IP long, and after reading all the comments, I wasn’t sure what to do about the amount of water, rice setting etc. But looking at the recipe again, I noticed it said “Select the ‘RICE’ button OR follow the cooking chart below.” (My emphasis added on the “or.”) So I kept it at 1 cup of rice, 1 cup water, and the other ingredients, and used my IP rice setting, which is low pressure for 12 minutes. Rice came out great! It was a little salty for me, so the only thing I would change next time is to halve the salt. Thanks for the tips, Erin!

    Reply
  39. 5 stars
    I have a 3Q IP. Thanks! Love your tips in addition to the recipes. Not making it tonight but am interested in tips for cooking black rice. I usually make coconut rice but for this week’s meals that won’t work. Until then never had a successful rice cook so am thrilled with IP. Still a newbie as I am very late to the IP trend.

    Reply
  40. Hi Erin, I am an expert on ip now that I have cooked in it all of 4 times. Lol. I am following the recipe but the rice keeps coming out sticky. What am I doing wrong?

    Reply
  41. I am new to the Instant Pot so I am in the learning phase of cooking different foods. The recipe states to see chart for cooking time. I don’t see a chart only a range of times for each type of rice. For white rice, it has a range of 4 to 8 minutes. That is a very broad range for cooking rice. I’m guessing more time for more rice but what is the range of volume of rice? 1 to 4 cups? Am I missing something? Have I overlooked the chart?

    Reply
  42. 5 stars
    This method worked great.
    Years ago I read the best way to “fluff” rice is to use the 2 prong meat fork( which shouldn’t be used for meat as it releases the juices) and that DOES seem to do a superior job. Also if rice is done early, place a kitchen towel over the pot then the lid so it doesn’t get mushy with condensation dripping back into the rice. It can stay hot a long time then

    Reply
  43. 5 stars
    Erin, absolutely loved this! Made a few tweaks, as I literally never follow a recipe 100%, but this was so yummy I will actually make it again! Thank you!

    Reply
  44. 5 stars
    Erin, this was wonderful! Never knew that those flavors would come out as they did in this beautiful dish! Follow the recipe word for word!!!

    Reply
  45. 5 stars
    This method worked great.
    Years ago I read the best way to “fluff” rice is to use the 2 prong meat fork( which shouldn’t be used for meat as it releases the juices) and that DOES seem to do a superior job. Also if rice is done early, place a kitchen towel over the pot then the lid so it doesn’t get mushy with condensation dripping back into the rice. It can stay hot a long time then

    Reply
  46. I am cooking Basmati rice with 1:1 1/4 ratio. I also used 8 minutes RICE auto feature. However the rice is not expanding as much as it does when cooking in a normal pot without pressure. How Can I over come this issue?

    Reply
  47. 5 stars
    I’ve been living away from home for years and my mom is a big fan of instant pot and she bought the Instant Pot Max to my dorm and shared a few links which had few recipes. I made the first bowl of rice (the first time I’ve cooked) by following your recipe. It indeed is a perfect way to cook rice! Thanks a lot for keeping it public for free!

    Reply
  48. 5 stars
    I tried the rice recipe. I put 2 cups rice to 2 cups water. It turn turned out great. My husband loved it. I have never used an instant pot before, I was real pleased. I will be trying some more of your recipes. Thank you greatly.

    Reply
  49. 5 stars
    As a newbie to the InstantPot, I am always a little skeptical. Since we are at a high altitude (7000ft), I did make one minor adjustment. We did 2 cups of rice and 3.5 cups liquid. I never make my rice with just water, but usually do some home chicken stock. I was out of my own so used 1 can chicken broth and one can (almost full) of water. My instructions told me 12 min due to altitude, so that is what we did and then let it naturally steam down for 10 min. Hubby said we are NEVER cooking rice without the instantpot again! He chowed it down and so did my daughter. Thank you!

    Reply
  50. Hi Miss Erin!
    I have a new pressure cooker (bought it 2 years ago) and have never used it…lol. I bought it to make homemade yogurt and yet to have done that. I have been cooking everything on a hot plate because my LG range went wack. One of the burners would not turn off and got stuck on HI. Yikes! So I cut the breaker and it just sits in my kitchen taking up space. Anyway your blog inspired me to dust off the my old/new pressure cooker and try making rice. Thank you for the inspiration – Rinda

    Reply
  51. I live is Louisiana along the southern coast. Rice is a staple in our life. I really thought hearing how great and fast rice was this would be like 5-10 minutes. Our rice cooker we have had our entire life is faster than the IPot. I think it is just easier to throw the rice in the rice cooker and call it a day. No checking, no building steam or releasing steam. You put it in the pot use the cup that came with it to measure the water, hit the cook button, voila perfect rice. It also has a steam basket. Love the insta pot but maybe not for rice. I think this is why we find they have a rice cooker on the market that I’ve seen. Here in my area I can pick up a rice cooker for $10-$15 and $5 on Black Friday.

    Reply
  52. 5 stars
    I think the issue with the water to rice ratio is dependent on the type of white rice used. We have a bag of arborio white rice (short grain) and it was *very* al dente with only one cup of water. I added another 1/2 cup and it was much better. I’ll try again with 1.5 and 1.75 cups at the start to find the perfect ratio for our type of rice. Using the IP to make rice during our kitchen remodel will be awesome and thank you for the base recipe!

    Reply
  53. This does not work for me!

    i tried this recipe, 1 cup of basmati and 1 cup of water- wash my rice, soak it for 30 minutes and then put 1 cup of rice and 1 cup of water in the IP, close it to sealed and pressure cook it for 4 minutes. After a few minutes, not even 4, the IP says burn. I panicked and i quickly switched off and release the pressure. Open the IP and the rice is stick on the bottom of the IP but still hard.

    What am i doing wrong? Please help me as I really want to learn how to cook basmati in my IP

    Reply
    • Hi – What comes to mind is that maybe the plastic ring isn’t in place correctly? Be sure that it is under the ring all the way around so the pot will seal correctly and come to pressure. Hope that helps!

      Reply
      • @erin thanks for reply. I think it was properly close, as usual. It has happened a couple of times now, i am scared to do it again as it is difficult to clean the IP afterwards. will need to try again then

        Reply
  54. I tried this rice yesterday. Rinsing rice before cooking, wow a lot of starch. I followed directions. Except because I cooked 2 cups of rice and 2 1/2 c water due to my instant pots rice button is 10 min. The most perfect rice. I used to do I the microwave, but water over boiled and made microwave a mess. I will always use instant pot for rice.

    Reply
  55. I used your recipe for my pressure cooker rice. The 1:1 ratio worked perfectly for me. 🙂 I’ve always made my rice in a rice cooker so first time trying before I found this I was dumbfounded. Thank you!

    Reply
  56. 5 stars
    I failed the first time I tried making rice in the instant pot, mostly because I followed the manual that came with it, but it turned out too mushy. When I searched for another recipe online, I found this, and it turned out perfectly! Very helpful and clear. Thank you so much!

    Reply

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