Slow Cooker “Better Than Botox” Bone Broth

Jars of slow cooker bone broth with crockpot in background.

This Slow Cooker “Better Than Botox” Bone Broth is full of natural collagen! Make chicken, pork or beef stock using kitchen scraps and this simple crockpot method.
Jars of slow cooker bone broth with crockpot in background.

I have a secret to share with you… I have a mysterious bag living in my freezer – my private stash. Every day I add a little something to it and hide it back away.

It’s not what you think. It’s bones. Chicken bones, beef bones, onion peels, carrot peelings, parsley bits, and celery ends… What normally would be tossed into the garbage is everything you need for a great bone broth in your slow cooker.

Ingredients for Slow Cooker "Better Than Botox" Bone BrothZiploc bag with ingredients for bone broth.

Bone broth is currently uber-popular and taking the nation by storm. It’s being touted as being better than botox, a cellulite reducer, great for arthritis and healing for the digestive tract. Devotees in New York City buy it by the coffee cup for nearly $9! Kobe Bryant and the entire Lakers team love it to refuel post-game. There’s also a reason that chicken soup has been know for generations as a cold-fighter.

Here in Portland, we recently got our first bone broth bar, Jola Cafe. Like you would with coffee or tea, you can customize your cup, but instead of milk and sugar, seasonings like smoked paprika, garam masala, nutmeg, tabasco, chili oil, and sriracha are added from the self-serve bar.

I love that there’s the option to pick up a cup of this healthy bone broth on the go. However, I prefer to make my bone broth at home, in the slow cooker. It’s so easy and SO much cheaper. When roasting a chicken, braising short ribs, chopping vegetables, and scrambling eggs throughout the week, add those bones, scraps and (rinsed) eggshells to a large ziploc bag in your freezer. When your baggie is full, empty it into your slow cooker, add water to cover and add a good glug of apple cider vinegar. The vinegar helps pull the nutrients out of the bones, but don’t worry, you won’t taste it.

It’s highly desired for your slow cooker bone broth to gel when cooled. This is a sign that it’s got plenty of great collagen and gelatin going on – those goodies that make your skin plump, coat your digestive tract, and cushion your joints. However, don’t worry if your bone broth doesn’t gel, it’s still got minerals and nutrition galore. It could simply mean that your ratio of water to bones is too great, or the quality of your bones may not be up to par. For example, conventionally raised chickens don’t have as much collagen in their joints and bones. Marrow rich beef on the other hand, will produce plenty of gelatinous goodness.

Jars of slow cooker bone broth

I like to enjoy my slow cooker bone broth straight up, in the late morning and late afternoon, like a savory cup of tea. Your slow cooker will provide you with about 4 quarts of broth. It will keep in the fridge for up to five days. For longer storage, I like to freeze one cup portions for easy use in recipes.

Jars of slow cooker bone broth with crockpot in background.

Slow Cooker "Better than Botox" Bone Broth

Course: Soup
Servings: 4 quarts
Calories: 50 kcal
Author: Erin - Platings & Pairings

This Slow Cooker "Better Than Botox" Bone Broth is full of natural collagen! Make chicken, pork or beef stock using kitchen scraps and this simple crockpot method.

Print

Ingredients

  • 2 carrots chopped medium
  • 2 celery stalks chopped medium
  • 1 medium onion chopped medium
  • 2 cloves garlic
  • 3.5 lb beef or chicken bones or combination of both
  • Kosher salt
  • 2 tablespoons apple cider vinegar
  • water

Instructions

  1. Place the bones your slow cooker. The bones should fill up about 3/4 of the slow-cooker.
  2. Chop your vegetables and garlic, no need to peel. You can also add vegetable scraps and rinsed, crushed egg shells into your slow-cooker. You'll be straining these out before consuming the broth.
  3. Fill the slow-cooker with water. Season with a generous amount of salt (about 1 teaspoon).
  4. Add 2 tablespoons of apple cider vinegar (you won't notice the taste).
  5. Cook on low and cook for 18-72 hours.
  6. Strain the broth through cheesecloth or a strainer and cool. A good broth will usually have a layer of fat on the top, and will gelatinize when thoroughly cool. Remove the fat with a spoon and discard.
Nutrition Facts
Slow Cooker "Better than Botox" Bone Broth
Amount Per Serving (8 oz.)
Calories 50
% Daily Value*
Sodium 37mg 2%
Potassium 149mg 4%
Total Carbohydrates 4g 1%
Dietary Fiber 1g 4%
Sugars 1g
Vitamin A 103.7%
Vitamin C 3.5%
Calcium 2.1%
Iron 0.5%
* Percent Daily Values are based on a 2000 calorie diet.

Want to make bone broth even faster? Try this Instant Pot Bone Broth recipe too.

This recipe was originally published in February 2015. It was revised in December 2017 to update the photographs and refresh the content. The delicious recipe for Slow Cooker Bone Broth remains the same. 

Jars of slow cooker bone broth with crockpot in background.

This Slow Cooker

209 comments

  1. Felix

    Thanx for the idea. I am making my own stock for years, but I never thought about doing it in the slow cooker. I also like the idea of using the celery and carrot ends!

    Reply

    1. Darlene Palmieri

      I do My Bone broth all day and All Night in the Crock pot !! the House Smell SOOOO Good all night long ! 😉

      Reply

      1. Sharon

        I made chicken drum sticks last nite I was wonder can i use the bones for stock?? Thank you Sharon

        Reply

        1. Erin

          Hi Sharon – You definitely can use those bones!

          Reply

          1. Paula

            I don’t cook meat with bones, so where and which type of bones should I buy?

        2. Pat

          Absolutely. I take all my left over bones and veggie ends. However I’ve added asparagus to mine, bc it is an awesome detoxifier.

          Reply

    2. Stacy

      I almost added eggshells to my bone broth, but was worried they wouldn’t dissolve and small pieces would get in my broth. Can you tell me how the shells break down, and what the benefits are?

      Reply

      1. Mallory

        Eggshells are composed of calcium carbonate, thus they are a good source of calcium. The vinegar you add to the pot is what actually breaks down the egg shells. The acetic acid in the vinegar reacts with the calcium carbonate to make free calcium, water and carbon dioxide. By heating your broth, you speed up the reaction so by cooking your broth for the length of time required by this recipe, I wouldn’t be surprised if your shells had completely dissolved by the time you go to strain it. If you’re concerned, just add a little more vinegar to the pot, that should do the trick!

        Reply

      2. Mallory

        Egg shells are comprised of calcium carbonate, thus they are an excellent source of calcium. The vinegar used in the recipe contains acetic acid which reacts with the calcium carbonate to break down the shells and release the calcium into the broth. Adding heat to a reaction like this can help speed it up, so I wouldn’t be surprised if your egg shells had completely dissolved when you went to filter your broth at the end. If you are concerned about them not dissolving completely, just add a little more vinegar.

        Reply

      3. Ben

        I don’t think they are meant to break down, after your cooking process is done you should pour broth through a fine mesh strainer or sieve. This will remove all the bits of food/egg shell/vegetable skins etc.

        Reply

      4. Melissa

        Stacy you strain your broth to get the eggshells out.

        Reply

    3. Don

      Why discard the fat? That’s blasphemy!! It’s a waste. Freeze it and use it to cook with in place of oils. It has much more flavor.

      Reply

      1. Erin

        Thanks for that tip Don!

        Reply

  2. Ami@NaiveCookCooks

    I am going to start doing this now! Long time back I read about a similar technique in martha stewart and I started making my own stash but I totally forgot and ended up throwing it hehe! But Thanks for reminding how easy and useful this is!

    Reply

  3. Krystal

    Bone broth is awesome! Thanks for sharing. Pinned.. 🙂

    Reply

  4. Julie @ Cooks with Cocktails

    Thank God I found this post! I recently got shot from my man for regularly leaving the stove on for 3 days. I told him its to create this delicious and healthy broth that you can’t get if you just boil bones for a couple hours or so. He’s not convinced that the health benefits outweigh the cost of electricity that it takes to run the stove that long lol. Thank you for solving my dilemma! Use the slow cooker. Duh! Thanks for posting!

    Reply

    1. Janet Stone

      The basic receipe
      was featured on Dr. Oz,,,bones alone give you amazing health benefits but of course including veggies etc makes it tastier.

      Reply

      1. McGee

        I would definitely do this, but without the scraps of egg shells. I like using beef boullion cubes or 1/2 of one in hot water when I get hungry between meals.

        Reply

        1. Karen

          Much healthier to make your own, tastes a million times better and you actually feel better to. Far too much salt in processed cubes. Enjoy!

          Reply

          1. C

            There’s sugar in boullion cubes, too

        2. R and Bo

          The cubes totally defeat the purpose. It’s not broth for taste or soup, it’s an elixir of nutrients for your health.. full the minerals, vitamins etc. Cubes are full of preservatives and sodium which are unhealthy. They are a cheat sheet for added flavor when making soup but bone broth is a completely different philosophy. My bf had a hard time understanding this. He was like “why would you make that” “that’s not how you make beef broth” “sounds disgusting.” So I sent him oodles of info on its benefits and he finally got it. We use one full beef knuckle from the butcher. Works great.

          Reply

      2. Suzanne Jurgens

        My hubby is the same except he won’t let me keep the gas stove on overnight🤪. I’ll be using the slow cooker now!

        Reply

  5. Vicky

    I’ve been making bone broth for years. I have my slow cooker going every Saturday and I usually don’t even get a chance to put the broth in the freezer because we use it up so quickly during the week. I love the idea of adding the scraps and bones in a freezer bag. What a great tip! I never thought of adding egg shells. I’ll have to add that to my pot next time around.

    Reply

  6. Matt @ Plating Pixels

    I was lucky enough to receive some homemade bone broth and I agree, it’s divine. The flavor is so rich there’s really no way to describe it, you just have to try it. I made a simple stew with it as the base, added chicken thighs, carrots and rice. A bit of Dijon mustard in the stew pairs wonderfully and adds a unique undertone. Thanks for the post on how to make it!

    Reply

    1. Erin

      Matt – The stew with mustard added in sounds wonderful!

      Reply

      1. annietime

        I can Taste it⁉️
        LOVE simple ideas😉
        Thanks

        Reply

    2. Barb

      I will have to try the mustard. Thanks for the tip!

      Reply

  7. DavetteB

    I make broth all of the time, (it is even better since the store started carrying calves’ feet; I like the pieces that stop at the ‘ankle’ for esthetics – perfect gel), but thanks for the tip of storing the assorted bits in the freezer and adding the egg shells! I love ideas that take the workload off of my brain.

    Reply

  8. BL

    Could you use pork bones?

    Reply

    1. Erin

      Yes – You could absolutely use pork bones for your broth. Sounds great!

      Reply

  9. Valerie

    M freezer looks similar! I love making slow cooker bone broth, chicken stock and seafood stock. Waste not, want not.

    Reply

  10. Alicia

    This may or maybe a dumb question but, where do I get bones???p

    Reply

    1. Erin

      Not a dumb question at all Alicia! You can either use bones from a leftover chicken or roast. Or, you can ask your butcher if they carry bones. My local market has the bones in the refrigerated pet section. Hope that helps!

      Reply

      1. Jodi

        I’m reading about bone broth, and noticing that you’re saying it’s ok to use cooked bones… But the other places I’ve read about it it, say to use raw bones, otherwise all you get is “stock”. ??

        Reply

        1. Erin

          Hi Jodi – Actually, roasted bones lend more flavor to the broth. Raw bones are perfectly fine to use as well though!

          Reply

      2. Lisa white

        You can also buy pork neck bones in your meat section at your local grocery store. They make great broth. Of course you cook the neck bones in a pot of pinto beans to get the meat off of them first.

        Reply

        1. Erin

          Sounds amazing Lisa!

          Reply

    2. Toyo

      I went tot he butchers section at mu local morrissons in london and they do carry bones! nice surrprise.

      Reply

  11. Barbara Adams

    Would it make a better broth if the butcher cut the bones into smaller pieces?

    Reply

    1. Erin

      Hi Barbara – I don’t believe the size of the meat matters. If you cook it long enough, you should get all of the nutrients and flavors from the meat. However, it may cook faster if you use smaller pieces.

      Reply

    2. Kristen Y

      I have been thinking about making bone broth for quite some time. The idea started when I was doing the Keto diet. Now I am trying out an anti-inflammatory way of eating, and iron chef Michael Simon mentioned that , while doing this plan he has been incorporating bone broth into his eating plan daily. I don’t have much information to speak of, but in knowing that most diseases iand ailments are caused by inflammation, I have decided to try this out.
      Per your question, I spoke with my butcher today and asked which bones to use and he said that Marrow bones would be excellent. Unfortunately, they didn’t have any so I bought some neckbones and beef shank. He said that since the beef neck bones were cut up a little smaller, they’d have more exposed marrow. There’s a lot of meat on there and I was thinking of making a borscht with some broth. I’ve been cooking this on low for 5hrs, 40 min. I just realized that I had saved frozen chicken wing tips to use for stock. Should I throw them in? Is leaving a crockpot on low a safe temperature for the bones or meat to stay untainted for 72 hours? Honestly, my house is like an icebox so I don’t fret too much, just have never tried this.

      Reply

  12. John C

    do you roast raw bones first?

    Reply

    1. Erin

      Hi John – If you have bones that have been roasted, by all means, use those. They give the broth a richer flavor. However, you can also throw raw bones into the slow cooker and get a great flavor as well.

      Reply

    2. Virginia Pfeffer

      Do I need to go to lowest temp on slow cooker after cooking for over 12 hours on 10 hour temp? There is one below called warm, am I safe to put broth on this for about 12 or so hours?

      Reply

  13. Debbie

    you say to cook for 18 to 72 hours that is a big difference. So for a medium size crock pot full how long would you say?

    Reply

    1. Erin

      Hi Debbie! The longer you let things cook together, the more intense the flavor. However, you’ll still get great flavor with just 18 hours. The time is up to you. Hope this helps!

      Reply

      1. Judy

        I have stoped eating meats raised on grains, with growth harmones & antibiotics. I buy pasure raised meats, (chicken, & wild caught fish) & eggs.
        Where can I get “organic” bones?
        Because if they are not born & raised organic, the harmones/antibotics are in the supermarket bones.

        Reply

        1. Callie

          I buy my organic, hormone/antibiotic-free bones online. I usually substitute bison broth for beef broth, so when I need bones for bison broth, I order them from http://www.wildideabuffalo.com If you prefer beef bones, you can just type “organic beef bones” into google and pick whichever online merchant appeals to you most.

          Reply

          1. Beth

            Hi,
            I throw all my organic bones in the pot with everything else. I also have the butcher cut up my venison (deer) neck and ribs etc. and throw in with everything else. I have not chemicals on my land and many deer because it joins the Fed. parkway. For those who know nothing about deer…it is naturally low in fat and very healthy. Never knew what to do with the bones until now! Tastes GREAT!

          2. Robert G von Giebel

            ArticFoods.com. All Organic!

  14. Sheri

    I have made my own broth for years but I have never used egg shells. What do the egg shells add?

    Reply

    1. Erin

      Hi Sheri – The egg shells help to add some additional calcium and minerals to the broth.

      Reply

  15. Phil

    Can I ask what the best way is to reheat the broth.
    Many thanks

    Reply

    1. Erin

      Hi Phil! You can simply reheat in the microwave, or on the stovetop if you prefer.

      Reply

  16. carole

    just made it!! cooked it 24 hours. didn’t strain it, cooled it and took all the fat off, then we ate it like a soup!!
    we feel stronger already!! cant’ wait to try it again

    Reply

    1. Erin

      Awesome – I’m so happy to hear the feedback Carole. Cheers!

      Reply

    2. Kim Weir

      Microwaves kill all good nutrients!!!!!!!

      Reply

      1. Nickie

        Microwave does not kill nutrients.

        First of all, nutrients aren’t alive.

        Secondly, the original “microwave kills” study was flawed. The study “boiled” broccoli in water in the microwave then tested the nutritional value of the broccoli after removing it from the water. The nutrients had transferred to the water out of the broccoli. This happens when food is boiled whether it is in the microwave or on the stovetop.

        Steaming and microwave cooking are actually the best cooking methods to retain nutrients in food. A quick google search will provide you with more scientific information on this.

        Also heating food in general can can break down (some) nutrients. The good thing about the microwave is it actually reduces heating time meaning less heat and a lower rate of broken down nutrients.

        Reply

  17. Angie

    Should the slow cooker be on high? I started my first batch at 3pm on high and its boiling.

    Reply

    1. Erin

      Hi Angie – It’s best to cook the bone broth at low heat if you plan on cooking it for the time recommended.

      Reply

      1. Denise

        I’ve also been making my own broth for years but I’ve always done it on the stovetop and I really love the idea of the crockpot since I can cook it longer and slower to get all the nutritional benefits!! Every time someone in my family starts to get a cold I start the broth and many times we’ve warded off viruses just by having a cup/bowl. “Better than Botox”…?? I’m just curious how much someone would need to drink to see a difference in their skin. I tend to retain water so when I drink a lot of broth my fingers get swollen. I try to add more water than usual and if I ever use store bought chicken stock for anything I always use low sodium. Anyway, just curious about the specific health benefits just out of curiosity. Thanks for posting Erin 🙂

        Reply

        1. Erin

          Hi Denise – This bone broth really does aid with your skin because it is full of collagen and nutrients. However, I’m definitely not a doctor, or even a health specialist, so I can’t account for how much you would really need to drink to see a difference. My motto is – Everything in moderation. I enjoy drinking the broth to help to get some of those nutrients that may be lacking in other areas of my diet. Hope this helps!

          Reply

  18. D'Anna Jurgensmeyer

    Can you also use pork bones for the broth, or ONLY chicken and beef?

    Reply

    1. Erin

      Hi D’Anna – You can definitely use pork bones. Any bones you have on hand should work great. I think the pork would be AMAZING! I’d love to hear back on how it turns out!

      Reply

  19. Linda

    Hi.

    Great recipe.
    A couple of questions;

    1. Should the bones be uncooked / raw, or cooked ones?

    2. I don’t have a slow cooker, so how long should I cook this on low heat in a regular pot, after bringing it to a full boil?

    IHope to hear a respond on this.

    Thanks ahead.

    Sincerely.

    Linda

    Reply

    1. Erin

      Hi Linda – You can use cooked or uncooked bones. Cooked will have some more flavor, but uncooked work just as well. After bringing to a boil, I would let this simmer for at least 4 hours on low heat. I hope this helps!

      Reply

      1. Linda

        Hi Erin.

        Thanks for the respond.
        I definetly will try it. 🙂

        Have a nice day, and weekend. 🙂

        Reply

    2. Rhonda

      You can use an electric pressure cooker also. I pressure for an 1 1/2 hours then cool and check if the bones are not a little brittle where a fork goes in I add more water and pressure again for 1 1/2 hours. After I get the results I want from the bones I add my vegetable and cook then eat. I will be adding some vegetables now when starting. I am giving the brittle squashed strained bones to my dogs in their food with some water. They love it also. You can preserve by canning in pint or quart jars if you are not going to use immediately or have a lot.

      Reply

      1. C

        I often read that cooked bones should not be fed to pets, only the raw bones. Bone broth is good for pets just like people

        Reply

  20. Linda

    Hi again.

    Sorry, but I forgot to ask you two more questions.

    1. In the instruction, you say to chop the vegetables, AND the garlic…the garlis isn’t among the ingredients. So I’m wondering if there should be garlic included, and if so…how many cloves?

    2. After filling jars with this broth, how long does it last in the fridge?

    Reply

    1. Erin

      Hi Linda – Thank you for catching that! I amended the instructions to include the garlic (2 cloves). However, it is optional. Feel free to use as much or as little as you would like. In the fridge, the broth should last up to 5 days. If you’d like to store it for longer, I’d suggest freezing it. It will last in the freezer for up to 6 months. However, if freezing in mason jars, be sure to leave space in the jar, so that the jar does not crack.

      Reply

    2. Sarah

      You are giving your dog cooked bones? Madness. My dogs eat raw bones but cooked bones can be deadly. Please don’t do that.
      My dogs get bone broth every day. I also make it in my InstantPot. My Terrier has an old hunting injury and it hasn’t bothered her since starting the bone broth.
      If only I ate as well as my dogs !

      Reply

      1. Scarlet

        Just make sure if you’re giving it to dogs to not use onions or garlic… that’s toxic for dogs.

        Reply

  21. Corita

    So after you made the broth, what are the best way to use in drinks? Any good recipes. Thank, ready to try.

    Reply

    1. Erin

      Hi Corita – I just drink this straight up, warm.

      Reply

  22. LM

    I would recommend using organic bones. If you are making the broth for health reasons-to help arthritis, digestion, etc. The bones from any butcher may have been antibiotics or worse in them. I also used water from my Brita filter so as not to get any unwanted lead that could possibly in the water. Just a suggestion.
    Good luck and good health .
    God Bless.

    Reply

    1. Toyo

      This is hard to find in South London. I’m going round butchers to ask whether they sell organic meat. Morrisions told mewhat they have is ‘farm assurred’ meat, that because of the way , animals can’e be grazing all year. so its mostly farm raised. I think wha I wanted to know was whether the meat is organic i.e grass fed animals but I still am not sure.

      Reply

      1. Lisa

        Brita filters are very minimal in the substances they filter. Compare Pur and some of the other other filters. You’ll be surprised.

        Reply

      2. Ingrid

        Hello! I’m finally cooking my first batch of bone broth after hearing about the benefits of it from my best friend. She advised to use raw chicken wings or drumsticks and only organic. I live in the UK too and found that certain Waitrose stores sell organic wings/drumsticks. (Chicken wings are much cheaper than the drumsticks). I used this receipe as a guide and added fresh turmeric, fennel to the mix as well. 4 hours in and aiming for 30 in my slowcooker. Wish me luck!

        Reply

        1. Erin

          Good luck Ingrid! I’d love to hear back on how it worked for you!

          Reply

  23. Tracy

    Can it be canned for storage?

    Reply

    1. Erin

      Hi Tracy – I have only ever frozen my broth. But, you can definitely can too! Here’s a great article on how to do so.

      Reply

    2. Julia

      Hi Toyo, I’m in the UK too. I’ve just ordered organic chicken carcasses and organic beef bones from https://www.coombefarmorganic.co.uk They also sell chicken feet which are supposed to be very good too!

      Reply

      1. Virginia Pfeffer

        Erin, do you use the tallow, or should I just throw everything away after cooking? Thank you for your articles, live it!

        Reply

        1. Erin

          Hi Virginia – I just toss everything after the cooking process. Everything is pretty “spent” after that long cooking time.

          Reply

        2. Lavender

          You can save the tallow to make soap.

          Reply

  24. Marsha

    Should you mix the bones or keep separate ….like all beef or All chicken?
    Or whatever combination?

    Reply

    1. Erin

      Hi Marsha – Great question. You can use any combination that you would like!

      Reply

  25. Teresa

    This recipe sounds great, I’m looking forward to trying it. What benefits do the eggs shells have?

    Reply

    1. Erin

      Hi Teresa – It’s said that the egg shells help to add calcium to the broth.

      Reply

  26. Lorie

    Hi..what herbs or roots would you recommend? what about a seeded jalapeño? Turmeric? Bay leaves? Parsley?

    Reply

    1. Erin

      Hi Lorie – You can use whatever herbs you like the best! A seeded jalapeno should add some good heat and interest to the broth – I’ve been meaning to try that combination. Bay leaves would be amazing! I almost always have some parsley in my bag of frozen vegetable scraps, so that’s usually thrown into my version. Hope this helps! Have fun experimenting!!!

      Reply

  27. Christy

    Should the bones be thawed or can you use frozen bones?

    Reply

    1. Erin

      Hi Christy – It is perfectly OK to use frozen bones. Just be sure that they have sufficient time to cook so that all the nutrients will be released.

      Reply

  28. Day Dreamer

    This is great!!! I have pets, could they benefit from this broth also?

    Reply

    1. Erin

      Hi there. Bone broth is great for pets too. Just be sure that you’re not using any ingredients that are detrimental to their health, like onions and garlic.

      Reply

      1. Ramona

        I always freeze the broth that I can’t fit in jars in an ice cube tray and give them to my dog as a treat. One caveat – now he turns his nose up at plain old ice cubes!

        Reply

        1. Erin

          What a great idea Ramona – I’m sure my dog would love that too!

          Reply

  29. Lynn

    Hi Erin,

    I will definitely try your recipe! I tried making bone broth today and it turned out very “oily” tasting. Any ideas of why this is? I tried to skim the top but it all looked the same. Thanks for any advice! Lynn

    Reply

    1. Erin

      Hi Lynn: Sometimes it’s difficult to get all the fat removed. I’ve found that it helps to let the broth cool in the refrigerator. The fat will solidify and rise to the top, then just skim it off with a spoon. I hope this helps!

      Reply

      1. EK

        Will skimming the fat off the top also remove the gelatin layer?

        Reply

        1. Erin

          I find that the gelatin remains, it tends to be disbursed throughout the soup.

          Reply

  30. Sandra

    I’m making my first batch today. However I have a whole chicken. Do I take the meat off when it’s done and let the bones cook for 24hrs?

    Reply

    1. Erin

      Hi Sandra – That sounds like exactly what I would do! Go ahead and set the meat aside for another recipe, or just throw it into your bone broth when it has finished cooking. Hope this helps!

      Reply

  31. Sunny

    We had a show pig butchered and somehow ended up with head in the freezer. Is there some way to use that to make bone broth?

    Reply

    1. Erin

      Hi Sunny – I haven’t yet tried that, but I think it would work. Here’s a post I found on making pig’s head soup.

      Reply

  32. Grace

    thanks for this post! I got a kick out of reading the questions (2 garlic cloves or 3??) … did no one else grow up with a stock pot on the stove all winter?? No recipe needed guys, just clean out the fridge!

    Reply

    1. Erin

      You are SO welcome Grace – Thanks for stopping by!

      Reply

    2. C

      Why are you even reading this recipe then?

      Reply

  33. Charli

    You said that this should produce about 4 quarts of broth. After cooking it for 48 hours I ended up with about one and a half quarts. Should I be adding water as it cooks to keep it from condensing too much?

    Reply

    1. Erin

      Hi Charli – You can definitely add water during the cooking process if it’s condensing quite a bit. The amount of broth that you get will vary based on how full your crockpot is with bones and vegetable scraps as well. Hope this helps!

      Reply

  34. Monica Matthews, how2winscholarships.com

    Making this right now. Thanks for the clear and easy to follow directions! 🙂

    Reply

    1. Erin

      Of course – Enjoy Monica!

      Reply

  35. Jennifer Irizarry

    Hey Erin!
    I just bought a book off amazon called Brodo. It’s a bone broth book from a guru in NYC. You’d love it! I have a bag of bones in my freezer right now ready to simmer. Do you freeze in mason jars? I’m concerned about them cracking. I bought the wide mouth ones in hopes that it will prevent breakage.

    Reply

    1. Erin

      Hi Jennifer – When freezing, definitely leave at least an inch of empty space, otherwise the jars will crack. I freeze mine in mason jars all the time and it is just fine this way. Enjoy!

      Reply

  36. DonnaM

    Your recipe sounds amazing, but I am cooking for one and my freezer is full. Instead of freezing, can this be canned in a pressure canner?

    Reply

    1. Erin

      Hi Donna – Yes! You could definitely can this too.

      Reply

  37. Soelil

    Thank you for sharing. I really love drinking bone broth. I’ve ben drinking Au Bon Broth and I like it so far because of how it helped me with my sleeping problems.

    Reply

  38. Linda

    After cooking the whole chicken, I pick the meat off the bones and then I strain. Instead of discarding, I put it in the food processor then freeze the “mush” and use it as “filler” for other meals.

    Reply

  39. Sandy

    Hi I’m wondering if you can use deer bones? Its almost hunting season and these bones would be organic per say.

    Reply

    1. Erin

      Hi Sandy – I’ve never made venison broth myself, but I think it would be great. There should be no issues with using deer bones.

      Reply

      1. Beth

        Hi Sandy, I use deer bones. I never put chemicals on my property and joins Fed. parkway. So I consider them grass fed and organic. For those who do not know about deer…they are very low fat, very lean. They won’t eat anything that is not good for them. They eat only grass and grains. Venison is a very healthy meat to consume. I have the butcher cut the neck into several pieces and keep the bones, such as ribs etc. This is what I add to my broth with organic beef bones that have been cut into about 2 inch pieces. I throw everything else in like the egg shells, celery, carrots, garlic, parsley and just everything. It tastes GREAT!

        Reply

  40. Theresa

    I have my slow cooker going as I type this. Coming up to 18 hrs. This is my first time. Acupuncturist told me to consume bone broth due to not sleeping, poor concentration etc. I am excited to see how I feel after drinking the broth. I got an organic chicken but the bones did not fill the slow cooker. Smaller chicken. Hopefully the ratio of water to bones will be ok.

    Reply

    1. Erin

      I think that you will be great regardless Theresa! It may not be as thick with fewer bones, but you will still get some great health benefits from the bone broth. I hope you enjoy!

      Reply

  41. Cathryn

    Hi my doctor got me into cooking bone broth. She told me to buy always organic and buy a whole organic chicken and after 8 hours on low to take the meat off the bones for the freezer. Continue to cook the bones and veggies for at least another 24-36 hours and also add more filtered water. I also use Himalayan pink salt!

    Reply

    1. Erin

      Sounds great Cathryn – I’m definitely reading more and more that organic is important for those bones. I’m going to work on revising the recipe.

      Reply

  42. peggy Proffit

    I’ve read through the comments and several sites to see–wouldn’t it matter a lot that these bones be organic?? . Animals store the antibiotics and everything else given them in their fat and sinews . I would think we’d be getting a super concentrated amount of bad stuff in this bone broth.
    And yet it’s very hard to find organic beef with bones, chicken a little easier. I want to do this but can’t get over thinking about the hidden stuff.

    Reply

    1. Erin

      Yes Peggy – I think it is definitely best to use organic bones. Thanks so much for pointing out this helpful information.

      Reply

  43. Jill

    I did 72 hours in the crock pot on low and it burned! It was very bitter, and think we’ll just throw it out 🙁 I guess I’ll have to try again and do much less time?

    Reply

    1. Erin

      Hi Jill… Hmmm. I’m not quite sure what happened. Make sure that you have enough liquid in there and yes, maybe try just giving it 24 hours? It sounds like your crock pot may cook hotter than most. I hope this helps!

      Reply

  44. Poochie1

    Are my bone broth I have the butcher cut it up into two in pieces to get the bone marrow out that’s where you get the best and I also soak my egg shells for a couple days and it’s Ziploc bag with vinegar so it gets all the calcium and also the membrane in the egg is very good for you so make sure you put that in the kettle to and if I have too many eggshells I just crush it and put them in a ziplock bag in the freezer with vinegar on them yet did you get more goodness out of it. I have a lot of sunchoke flowers or Jerusalem artichokes whatever you want to call him and I add them and some of the leaves to the broth and also some of the feelings from them after I scrub them up good and I use the plant leaf it’s on my yard and anything like that but that’s good to eat the greens and I put them in the kettle with the bones I cook them slow on top of my burner first so they both fit in that kettle when I go to slow cook them I have a slow cooker kettle also when you when you get ready to strain it make sure you have a fine soon that will do it and sometimes I put cheesecloth and if the if I use eggshells because the egg shells might go through if they’re crushed so I just put cheesecloth in the strain or first

    Reply

  45. Bluet

    I followed all your instructions.
    I have a small 2 qts crock pot .
    I left it in low for 72 hs.
    My broth came out really dark. I made it with chicken meat and bones.
    the veggies were really dark at the end of the process, like burnt and everything looks brownish. Is that normal ?
    I don’t like the taste too much but I will drink it.
    Next time I will try with cow bones.

    Reply

    1. Erin

      Hi! I’ve noticed that the color of my broth comes out differently every time for some reason… Also, it seems that some crockpots are cooking at a higher temperature than others. I would suggest keeping an eye on it and giving it a taste after 36 hours. Hope this helps!

      Reply

      1. Rhonda

        try just cooking the meat and bones first. Then take the meat off the bones when meat is done and put into the fridge don’t put the vegetables in right away. Cook bones around the 72 hours mark Add the vegetables let cook when soft puree them into the broth and strain.
        For a meal with the broth, add the meat back in and any vegetables you may want to eat with the meat. I hope this helps.

        Reply

  46. Jim

    Do you need to get ALL the meat off the bones before starting the process or will straining take care of the meat?

    Reply

    1. Erin

      The straining will take care of that – No worries to start with meat on the bones.

      Reply

  47. Sarah

    I had forgotten about garlic being toxic to dogs until reading comments on this recipe for bone broth. Turns out, I was specifically making this batch for my dog so I will save for my use instead. As more and more pet owners are learning about the benefits of bone broth for their fur babies, it would be a great idea for you to mention this next to garlic in the ingredients.:)

    Reply

  48. Ali

    A few questions:

    1. Ho much water should you actually put in? I just made this recipe and added about two – three cups but didn’t get a frothy too so thinking I might have added too much water from the jump.

    2. It says ler it come to a boil first. I didn’t do hat properly either, I don’t believe. Should the slow cooker be out on high at first and then set to low after?

    Thanks in advance!

    Reply

  49. Kelly Mahan

    Very interesting, don’t think I ever saw or read about this before, thanks for the idea!

    Reply

  50. Sharon

    I just made my first pot of broth it’s cooking on my wood stove wondering if I can eat my veggies I put in like carrots turnip celery ??? Thanks Sharon

    Reply

    1. Erin

      Hi Sharon – They’re going to be quite mushy, if they’re even still in solid form. They probably won’t be edible.

      Reply

  51. Shilo

    Thank you for this recipe! I made my own bone broth for the first time this week and it was delicious. However, I accidentally left it out overnight after I turned the slow cooker off. It was out on the counter for about 10 hours from when I turned the slow cooker off last night before I put it in the fridge this morning. Is it trash now?

    Reply

    1. Erin

      Yes – I would not eat it Shilo. Bummer!!!

      Reply

  52. Haley

    Thanks for this great recipe!
    To distinguish between the fat layer and gelatin … will the fat layer be more opaque and white?
    Is it for health/dieting reasons to remove fat or is it safe to keep and consume the fat layer?

    Reply

    1. Erin

      Hi Haley – The opaque, white layer will be the fat. You can definitely remove that if you prefer. I normally will leave it if there is not too much of it.

      Reply

  53. Sophia

    Does this help get rid of wrinkles? Particularly deeper ones? For example, the line that can form above the nose and in between the eyes? I guess I’m asking… besides the health benefits, is it turkey better than Botox?

    Reply

  54. Michelle

    Hello, I had a question. If we use cooked bone scraps, do they need to be rinsed before we actually cook them in the broth?

    Reply

    1. Erin

      Hi Michelle – No need to rinse them.

      Reply

  55. Angela

    I am so happy to have found this recipe. I am having gastric sleeve surgery this month and it is necessary to have clear broth after recovery. Thank you for sharing. I will be making a bunch of this in advance.

    Reply

    1. Erin

      You are welcome Angela – Best wishes for a speedy recovery!

      Reply

  56. Jen

    Can I add a a stock cube in place of extra salt?

    Reply

  57. Fiona

    This recipe looks Delish! So funny and cool that you got your own broth bar – our little town will proabably take a while with that yet! 🙂

    Reply

  58. Jacque

    Have you ever used a ham bone? I froze the bone from our Christmas ham, and thought I could use that with zny others that we save in the freezer. Can’t wait to try this! A turkey carcass would work great too, right?

    Reply

    1. Erin

      I think that either of those would be amazing as a broth Jacque!

      Reply

  59. Jill Roberts @ WellnessGeeky

    This bone broth looks absolutely fantastic. Beautiful photos, too. I look forward to trying this. Definitely I will prep it on the weekend for my family.

    Reply

    1. Erin

      Thanks so much Jill – I hope you enjoy it!

      Reply

  60. Randi S

    Hello There. We are a deer hunting family. Would deel bones be acceptable as well for bone broth? Thanks for the inspiration and information.

    Reply

  61. Patricia

    This is my first time making beef broth and it came out a beautiful dark brown! It seems that I have a lot of oil floating on top of my broth in the jars. I. Think it may be from roasting the bones with a coating of olive oil. Will the fat harden underneath it so I can easily remove it? Any suggestions?
    Thank you!

    Reply

    1. Erin

      Hi Patricia – Normally my fat will harden after the broth chills. Then I’ll remove that and enjoy the broth. Cheers!

      Reply

      1. marge201

        After straining the broth, I pour it into metal bowls and let it sit in fridge 1-2 days. Then I skim and discard the entire layer of solid fat that forms, scooping up stray bits of it with a hand-held strainer, so it’s perfectly clear and then pour into glass containers for the freezer. I’m probably discarding collagen plus fat but it’s all in one layer and I can’t possibly tell the difference so it all goes in the trash. I use it for cooking grains, soup base, and adding it to food before reheating (using the steam function on the Instant Pot).

        Reply

  62. Rich

    I discovered this works incredibly well in the Instapot if you want to try an alternative to the slow cooker. It cuts the cooking time to about 45 min, I also think the pressure cooking effect brings out more flavor. Thanks so much for the recipe.

    Reply

    1. Erin

      It does! I’ll be putting out an Instant Pot version soon!

      Reply

  63. Fiona

    Hello Erin,
    This is Fiona. I am a huge fan of your work and would love to include you in my round up post.

    If you would like to participate, please answer this following question and I will link your site to this post on https://www.bbroth.com:

    What is the greatest health benefit that bone broth has given you?

    Thank you so much in advance,
    Fiona

    Reply

  64. Stacy

    I made some of this and it turned out just like the picture. It tastes fantastic too! My question is how much of this do I need to consume each day to get the most benefit. I could drink all of it now it is so good

    Reply

  65. sharon Ianoale

    I have been making chicken and beef stock like this for YEARS , it amuses me that in NY it is now the rage at $9 as cup. My Jewish and Italian heritage always start out soups with good homemade broth from stock. Maybe that is why my family has good skin and live long lives

    Reply

  66. 8 Foods That Heal The Digestive System - Happy Body Formula

    […] or wild-caught animals because these are the most nutritious sources. You can also make it in the slow cooker or the Instant Pot. If your bone broth gels as it cools, you’ve made a very collagen-rich […]

    Reply

  67. Laura

    What do you do with the bones after your broth is fully cooked?

    Reply

    1. Erin

      Hi Laura – I just toss them in the trash. They’re pretty much spent after all that cooking time.

      Reply

  68. Casey Schumacher

    Any idea if digestive issues associated with eating beef, would be the same with a beef bone broth? I have a terrible time digesting red meat so I usually try to avoid it, wondering if the bone broth would have the same effects? Through my research it seems like beef bones and seafood collagen are the most effective but beef seams easiest to work with.

    Reply

  69. Jeannie

    I totally forgot to add apple cider vinegar. We’re on 18 hours. Can I add now and let cook continue for another 12 hours?

    Reply

    1. Erin

      Hi Jeannie – I would just skip the ACV this time. It will still be great (and great for you), but it may not have pulled all the nutrients. You’ll still get great benefits from this batch.

      Reply

  70. Crystal

    Hi there! Thanks for sharing! Can u tell me what size slow cooker u used? And how many cups of broth do u end up with for this recipe? Thanks so much!

    Reply

    1. Erin

      Hi Crystal – I use a 6-quart slow cooker and end up with about 9-cups of broth.

      Reply

  71. Patti Ferretti

    What is the best way to store bone broth? I see most pictures of it in Ball Jars. How long can it be stored?

    Reply

    1. Erin

      Hi Patti – You can store the bone broth in the freezer for up to 3 months. Just be sure that you leave about an inch of free room in the top of the jar to account for expansion during freezing. Hope this helps!

      Reply

  72. laura garcia aguilar

    Hi.!! I just have a big doubt… after cooking it for 40 Hours i realised there was no more liquid.!!!!! This should not happen, right??? I mean i know slow cooker does not loses vapour… so i added some more water but im Sure it shouldnt be like that… even if its my first time using it.. please help and recommendations :)))

    Reply

    1. Erin

      Hi Laura – That’s definitely odd that all the liquid evaporated. Adding additional water should not hurt it. Perhaps it is cooking at too high a temperature? You may also want to be sure that the lid is set on properly. Hope this helps!

      Reply

  73. Victoria Dryden

    I have been making broth for years in my crock pot. So much faster and easier. I have 2 plastic containers with a lid in the freezer and I just add bones and veggie parts as I cook. When they are full I place all in my crock pots and cook for 2-3 days. After I drain into a super large pot and let cool I strain the fat off the top. I then heat back up and can according to USDA recommendations. This way I always have tons of pints of broth to either heat up or use in cooking.
    Joys!!

    Reply

  74. Alex Maynez

    Why skim off the fat? Isn’t this the “good” kind of fat?

    Reply

  75. Heidi

    Looks easy enough and yummy! I don’t see any protein on the Ntrition Facts chart though…? I thought bone broth had collagen- which is protein…???

    Reply

  76. Sheela

    This recipe looks great. Quick question, my slow cooker can only cook for up to 8 hours max on low. I was wondering if I can “re-cook” the broth after the 8 hours is up for another 8 hours?

    Reply

    1. Erin

      You can definitely do that Sheela!

      Reply

  77. Bella Hardy

    This bone broth definitely looks yummy! I love your recipe cuz it contains healthy ingredients! Thanks, Erin a lot for sharing!

    Reply

    1. Erin

      You’re so welcome Bella – Thanks for stopping by!

      Reply

  78. tania

    How will I know when it’s done? What should the texture of the bones be like?
    Going to try this today.

    Reply

    1. Erin

      Hi Tania – Your bone broth should be deep golden in color. The aroma should let you know as well.

      Reply

  79. Austin

    are the bones from cooked meat or raw meat? Also is the egg shell from boiled eggs or uncooked?

    Reply

    1. Erin

      Hi Austin – I use bones from cooked meat, but you can also use raw bones. The cooked bones tend to lend more flavor, I’ve found. The egg shells can be either cooked or uncooked as well.

      Reply

  80. Erica

    Hi Erin,
    I’m in the process of making this for the first time! It’s been about 18 hours in the crockpot on low and I noticed the broth is beginning to disintegrate. Is that normal?

    Reply

    1. Erin

      Hi Erica – Do you mean the bones? It should be OK, but I would maybe stop the cooking process now if they’ve cooked down that much. Hope that helps!

      Reply

  81. Carol Schmitt

    I just heard about Bone Broth on The Chew a couple weeks ago. This is so interesting to me. I have bought some in the store. But now will make my own. I will start saving all my meat bones and vegie scraps. But in the meantime theres a farm very close to me that sell chicken feet. I will use those at this time as I heard and read it great broth if you use the feet. I grew up on on farm over 50 yrs ago. N If my grandma only knew what chicken feet would be used for.

    Reply

  82. Jessica Burrows

    Hi Erin,

    Can you use eggshells from hardboiled eggs or should they be fresh eggshells like from breakfast?

    Reply

    1. Erin

      Hi Jessica – Either will work!

      Reply

  83. Nicole

    So I made bone broth for the first time & the recipe said to leave it in the crock pot for 24-48 hours on the highest setting. It was in there for about 26 hours & when I opened it up, there was almost no liquid left in it. HELP! What went wrong?

    Reply

  84. Richard Coomer

    Hi Erin,
    Can one make this Bone Broth using raw marrow bones or must they be roasted/braised beforehand as the recipe says? I want to start off using fresh everything and later move to using scraps.

    Reply

    1. Erin

      Hi Richard – You can use raw bones but the flavor of the broth may not be as deep and developed.

      Reply

  85. Lynette aka breezermom

    I have been having stomach issues and looked on line and bone beef broth was recommended. I made this as directed for 48 hours. Removed from my slow cooker and strained, then placed in an ice water bath. I was surprised how fast the fat solidified and the broth gelled up. I will make this again…..the only problem was smelling it for 2 days while it cooked……kept waking me up because it smelled so good! Thanks for sharing.

    Reply

    1. Erin

      Of course Lynette! I’m so happy you enjoyed the recipe!

      Reply

  86. valerie

    I would like to try this recipe, but you say it has to be cooking for 3 day. I hope that this is wrong and I don’t have to cook this recipe for 3 hours. There is no way, that I can have something cooking for 3 days.

    Reply

  87. Melissa

    Hi! Just curious, in the recipe it says to remove the fat from the broth after it has gelatinized. I’ve been told before that the gelatinized far works to seal the bottle and Kerri’s the broth fresh- as long as you used sterile bottles- is the removal more of a preference? I ‘ve made homemade broth before and dumped everything, gel fat included- into the soup or whatever I am making with the broth… Is that bad?

    Reply

    1. Erin

      Nope – It’s definitely just a personal preference Melissa!

      Reply

  88. Cecelia

    I roast my bones for 40 minutes in a 400 degree oven then add vegetables, etc to roasting bones for another 40 minutes then put them in Ina stock pot and add water 2 inches above bones, etc. Bring to boil then simmer. Only simmered for 8 hours. I’ll see what it’s like tomorrow morning. My first time making this.

    Reply

  89. Christina

    I am excited to try this! Do you happen to know the amount of protein per serving?

    Reply

  90. linda

    Hi, I have problems getting chicken feet here in my rural scotland as they are sent to china. So could I use pheasant feet instead?

    Reply

    1. Erin

      That would work Linda!

      Reply

  91. Ali

    I made mine, but used the entire piece of meat with bone and meat attached. (I used short ribs) Does this still give you the same benefits with the meat attached? The broth is still tasty!

    Reply

  92. Sandra

    I am trying chicken bone broth for the first time in a slow cooker. There was some meat left on the bones. Will this detract from the cooking process extracting full nutrients from the bones?

    Reply

    1. Erin

      Hi Sandra – No problem there! You can definitely leave some meat on the bones.

      Reply

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